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Lughnasadh: First Harvest Sabbat

Lughnasadh: The Pagan Festival of the First Harvest



Lughnasadh is a festival marking the beginning of the harvest season. The word Lughnasadh comes from the Irish words "Lugh" and "nasadh", which mean "Lugh's festival".. It is also known as Lammas, which is an Old English word meaning "loaf mass." Lughnasadh is a time to give thanks for the abundance of the harvest and to honor the gods and goddesses of agriculture.


Lughnasadh is celebrated on August 1st, halfway between the summer solstice and the autumn equinox. It is a time of transition, as the days begin to shorten and the nights grow longer. This symbolizes the waning of the summer and the coming of autumn.



Here are some additional facts about Lughnasadh:

  • In some traditions, Lughnasadh is also known as Lammas, which comes from the Old English word "hlafmaesse", meaning "loaf mass". This is because the festival was traditionally a time to bake the first loaves of bread made from the new grain.

  • Lughnasadh is often associated with the Celtic goddess Tailtiu, who was said to have died from exhaustion after clearing the land for agriculture. In some traditions, Lughnasadh is seen as a funeral feast in her honor.

  • The festival is also associated with the Celtic god of agriculture, Goibniu. Goibniu was said to be a master blacksmith, and he would forge the tools that were needed for the harvest.

  • Lughnasadh is a time of great celebration, and there are many different ways to mark the occasion. Some people choose to feast on traditional foods, such as bread, beer, and cakes. Others choose to participate in games and competitions, such as hurling and wrestling. Still others choose to simply spend time in nature, enjoying the beauty of the harvest season.

The symbolism of Lughnasadh is rich and complex. The festival is associated with the god Lugh, who is a Celtic god of light, craftsmanship, and agriculture. Lugh is said to have invented the first harvest festival, and he is often depicted with a cornucopia, a symbol of abundance.


Other symbols of Lughnasadh include wheat, oats, barley, and other grains. These crops were the most important food sources for many cultures in the past, and they are still a staple food for many people today.



Lughnasadh is also associated with fire. Fire is a symbol of purification and transformation, and it is often used in rituals to mark the transition from summer to autumn.


Lughnasadh is a time for celebration, feasting, and giving thanks. It is also a time to reflect on the abundance of the harvest and to honor the gods and goddesses of agriculture.


Here are some of the ways that people celebrate Lughnasadh:

  • Gathering food: People often gather food for the harvest feast. This food may include bread, cakes, fruits, vegetables, and grains.

  • Making crafts: People often make crafts to celebrate Lughnasadh. These crafts may be made from natural materials, such as wood, straw, or flowers.

  • Performing rituals: People often perform rituals to celebrate Lughnasadh. These rituals may involve fire, music, or dance.

  • Gathering in community: People often gather in community to celebrate Lughnasadh. This may involve attending a festival or simply spending time with friends and family.

  • Bake a loaf of bread. This is a simple way to honor the harvest, and it is also a delicious way to enjoy the fruits of your labor.

  • Spend time in nature. Go for a walk in the woods, or sit by a lake or river. Take some time to appreciate the beauty of the natural world.



Here are some of the associated symbolism of Lughnasadh:

  • The cornucopia: The cornucopia is a symbol of abundance and fertility. It is often depicted as a horn filled with fruits, vegetables, and grains.

  • The sun: The sun is a symbol of light, life, and warmth. It is often associated with the summer solstice, which is the midpoint of the year.

  • The harvest: The harvest is a symbol of abundance, prosperity, and gratitude. It is a time to celebrate the fruits of one's labor.

  • Fire: Fire is a symbol of purification, transformation, and new beginnings. It is often used in rituals to mark the transition from one season to another.

If you are interested in celebrating Lughnasadh with local community you are encouraged to attend our Lughnasadh Eve art night!


Gratitude Mantra

Here is a simple gratitude mantra that you can use to celebrate Lughnasadh:

  • I am grateful for the abundance of the harvest.

  • I am grateful for the gift of life.

  • I am grateful for the love and support of my family and friends.

  • I am grateful for the beauty of the natural world.

  • I am grateful for the blessings in my life.



Art Therapy Exercise

Here is an art therapy exercise that you can try to celebrate Lughnasadh:

  • Gather some materials, such as paper, crayons, markers, or paints.

  • Find a quiet place where you can relax and focus.

  • Think about all of the things that you are grateful for.

  • Begin to draw or paint a picture that represents your gratitude.

  • There are no right or wrong answers. Just let your creativity flow




I hope you enjoyed this blog post about Lughnasadh!


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